Hi Numerologist community, thank you once again for joining me for another episode of the Numerologist Podcast. In this episode, we’re joined by wellness and self-love coach, Nati Valderrama.

In this episode, we’ll explore the art of self-love and shifting your mindset. Here, Nati will equip the tools to move into a place of self-acceptance and manifest the best version of you.

Listen below or on your favorite platform…

   

Here’s what we discuss:

  • Nati’s journey to self-love
  • How to adopt a more self-loving mindset
  • How to manifest your ideal life
  • How to clear self-sabotaging thoughts

Show Links

  • Your Free Numerology Report – video.numerologist.com
  •  Visit Nati’s website: https://www.nativalderrama.com/
  • Follow Nati on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nativalderrama/

Your Special Podcast Gift:

As a thank you for joining us here on the Numerologist Podcast, we’re giving you access to a very special video report which delves into the deepest levels of your numerology chart to help you understand who you are.

Get Your FREE Numerology Video Report Here: 

http:/video.numerologist.com

 


Full Transcript

Announcer:

Welcome to the Numerologist Podcast, where we bring you a very special guest every single week to help guide you on your spiritual journey. Live with abundance and inspire your soul.

Rose:

Hi Numerologist community, and welcome back to another episode of the Numerologist Podcast with me Rose. Now, today’s guest is Nati Valderrama, a health and wellness coach, passionate about helping people live happier and healthier lives. She’s the author of Get In My Belly a Healthy Sweet Ebook as well as 101 Simple Healthy Recipes. As a budding astrologer, Nati has taken a plunge this year, to blend this esoteric art with her coaching to delve into clients’ natal charts, and help them become more self-aware. And it’s a fitting addition as self-awareness is her overall coaching goal. Now please join me in welcoming, Nati. Hey Nati.

Nati Valderrama:

Hey Rose.

Rose:

Welcome to the podcast.

Nati Valderrama:

Thank you so much. I’m very excited to be here.

Rose:

We are too. Now, Nati in the intro there, I just mentioned that you are a health and wellness coach, but I find that all coaches have their own unique take on what that actually means. So, can you tell us what being a health and wellness coach actually means for you?

Nati Valderrama:

Yeah, so I started health coaching over a year ago, and when I started it was more focused on health, about nutrition, I had my eBooks, as you mentioned, but with time I’ve been changing that and adapting it a bit. Adding more like a well… What do you call it? A holistic point of view into it, more about wellness, more about self-care, the way that you talk to yourself. And I’ve been changing and adapting into now what I call self love coaching. So, it started more as a, this is what you should eat kind of thing, or let’s get you better nutrition-wise, but now it’s more, what works for you? What doesn’t work for you? How do you treat yourself? How do you talk to yourself? What practices do you have? What are your habits? So that’s where I’m heading at right now. And as you said with astrology, it’s been super great because of the whole self awareness part of it. What I really want for my clients is for them to know themselves and to love themselves at the end of the coaching program. Ideally.

Rose:

Yeah, absolutely. And it’s funny you say that your journey and the path you’re on is evolving, because when you started like you say, it was a lot about nutrition because you were on a bit of a body acceptance journey and loving the skin you’re in yourself, weren’t you? So, can you tell us a bit about your journey to self-acceptance that way?

Nati Valderrama:

Yeah, so it started in 2014. That’s how I started my whole journey and how I found my passion. I was really in a point where I was hating my body, I disliked myself generally. And I found this program, BBG, you probably know of her, of Kayla Itsines. She this personal trainer in Australia. And I saw pictures of her clients of before and afters and I was like, “I got to do that.” So, I started and I had a really impressive three months transformation. And it was so impressive that some of my friends were like, “You should start an Instagram, you should share it. You should share your pictures, your progress pictures.” And I was like, “Okay, fine, let’s do this.” And one day after posting my pictures, Kayla Itsines reposted them and I had 4,000 followers in one day. And that’s how I started my journey on Instagram. So, it basically just went up from there, some days I would have 9,000 new followers, and it was all very much just progress pictures and pictures of what I was eating. And it was very much fitness in that time.

But as time progressed and I started relaxing more and not eating so strictly, it took a little turn towards something different, towards something more integral and something more holistic. And I was already looking for what I wanted to do with my life. I studied advertising and that wasn’t really what I wanted to work in. I didn’t want to work for a big company or anything. I wanted to work for myself. So, I traveled to Australia. I lived there for a year and there I met a health coach. And I saw her lifestyle and I saw the way that she was helping people. And I was like, “That’s what I want to do.” I was already helping people on Instagram. I was giving people free advice, but I didn’t have anything really to back it up.

So, that’s why I ended up studying health coaching in the Institute of Integrative Nutrition in New York. It’s called IIN. And that’s what led me to where I am right now. But yeah, it’s definitely had its ups and downs. I mean, I lost a lot of weight then I gained a lot of weight back. And then I was like, “How do I find that middle point where I’m happy with my body despite the outer appearance?” So, it started very much like, “I want to be fit and I want to love my body.” But it was like, “I will love my body once I reach a certain goal.”

And then it got to a point where it was like, I was so skinny that there was no more weight to lose but I was still stuck on the physical, I guess. And then it went changing into something more internal, and how I felt about myself, and went through BBG and then weights and then yoga, and yoga really changes it for me because it became a integral mind, body and soul kind of thing instead of just a physical thing. So, that’s how I got to where I am right now.

Rose:

Absolutely. So, let’s actually talk about self-love as a whole, because it sounds you went on a journey to find self-love but you didn’t really realize what that looked like until you arrived at a certain destination. So, what is self-love?

Nati Valderrama:

Well, I’ve been thinking about that a lot these past few months. How do you define self-love? And I think the way that I would define it, is a journey towards your higher self. So, when you think about your higher self, you think about it like that seat from which you can see yourself better. And it’s a journey as I mentioned, so it’s never like, “Uh, I reached self love. I love myself now. End of story.” It’s something that you need to continue doing. So, when I think about self love, I think about it like an umbrella term, and then there’s all these small things that you integrate into it. So like the way that you care for yourself, your self care, your self-compassion, your self-fulfillment, your self-confidence, all of these things play a role in the bigger umbrella of what self-love is.

So, it might be different for everyone, but I do believe that it has to do with creating healthy habits, speaking to yourself in a kind and gentle way, and really taking care of your mind, body and soul in one way or another. So that’s where my coaching comes in. So, when I started as I mentioned, it was more like, “Let’s find ways that you can take better care of your body. Eat better and do more exercise.” And that was the initial promise of my coaching was, I’m going to get you to have these habits that will help you be healthier. But I think it goes beyond that where it’s, what habits are you including in your life that really pull you towards being that higher self.

When you are trying to manifest that ideal life for yourself, it’s usually a life where you love yourself and you feel confident and you feel happy and you feel fulfilled. So, the whole point of the self-love journey is to really start loving yourself every step of the way, because you realize that self-love is not a destination that you get to. It is a decision that you’re making day in and day out through your actions.

Rose:

And just on that day in, day out, repeated action type thing. Have you got any quick and simple tips or exercises that people can do to adopt a more self-loving mindset?

Nati Valderrama:

Well, there’s many things, but I think two of the things that have really helped me lately, have been my gratitude practice and my habit tracking. So, I have a Bullet Journal. Let me just show you. So, I don’t know if you’ve heard about bullet journaling, but basically you have a journal and you fill it in the way that you want and the way that it works for you, but one of the things that I’ve been doing has been a habit tracking practice. So, every day I track different things in my little journal. So, for example, the blue is the yoga. So I have all of my yoga, like I did yoga basically every day in June, July as well.

Then the purple is how many times I drank. So, I have other things. So how much I’m reading, how much TV I’m watching, things like that. So, I started tracking things that I wanted to add and things that I wanted to not have so much of. So for me seeing, oh yeah, I’ve been doing a lot of yoga. Cool. But then with the reading also cool, but with the drinking it’s like, “Oh, I’ve been drinking a bit too much.” So just being more aware of the habits that I have in my life and how they’re affecting me. So for me, usually the days that I’ve been drinking a lot, I see the next day I didn’t read, or I didn’t do yoga because I was hung over. So things like that. The habit tracker has been a really good addition into my daily practice so that I can really be intentional about what I’m doing, the habits that I’m adding or trying to remove from my life.

And then the gratitude practice is just, I write down three things that I’m grateful for every day. So, at first when I started it was super hard. I was like, “Okay, I’m grateful for my home. I’m grateful for my health.” But then it just becomes like, “Oh, I’m grateful for the sunshine that’s beaming through my window. I’m grateful for…” I don’t know, just the smallest things just become so much bigger. And then you realize the small things are the big things. And for me during quarantine, it’s really helped me just to see the magic in the little things.

And that for me has been one of the… those are the foundations of my self-love practices, it’s just putting in this active work throughout every day, because this is something I do daily. Where I’m just reflecting on my day, reflecting on my life and seeing what energies I’m putting out and what energies I’m receiving. That’s how I use my Bullet Journal anyway. And those are some things that I add to my daily life. And that really give me value.

Rose:

Absolutely. Now, I just want to let our listeners know if they’re listening on the podcast, they can head over to YouTube just to check out that Bullet Journal because it was really beautiful and it inspires me to do my own to be honest. So, watch this pace, I may have my own Bullet Journal very shortly. Now, what I’d really like to get your thoughts on, because obviously, when you started losing weight and started your journey, you started posting on Instagram. Is there some danger with people posting things like that on Instagram for their mindset? And obviously this is becoming more and more of a self-love movement going on there, but I’d really just like to get your thoughts on Instagram as a self-love tool overall.

Nati Valderrama:

Yes. So, when I started, I mean, I was getting so much external validation, and looking back on it now, it was like, “Wow.” That might’ve really harmed me in a way, because I was just posting these pictures where I was skinnier and skinnier, fitter and fitter and more and more people would congratulate me on it. So, then when I started gaining weight, I started losing followers, and that really affected me. And it took me a while to get used to it. And now I’m at a point I’ve lost hundreds and thousands of followers, but I’m at a point where it’s like, “Okay, whoever’s here really wants to see the content that I’m putting out and sees the value in the work that I’m doing.” So, it’s been a whole process of being okay with that. The other day I saw this quote on Instagram that says, “External validation is like a drug, internal validation is like a daily vitamin.” And that for me was like, “Whoa, exactly.”

Rose:

That gave me chills.

Nati Valderrama:

So for me, it’s been really important to use all of these internal validation practices that I can rely on. And yeah, sometimes I’ll get a little bit of external validation and I’ll put a post that does really well. And I have all these comments and people are congratulating me, or people are reaching out to me and saying they want coaching. And all of that feels great, but if I don’t have an internal validation practice, then it all just becomes super flimsy, and then I become addicted to the, okay, I need more likes, I need more posts.

So, I’ve been through that journey and it’s been rough, before I would try to post once a day or twice a day even and it was just this constant receiving validation. And it really helped me to build my self-confidence, but it got to a point where since I was depending on it, my self-confidence was very fragile. So now, I feel I’m at a point where I don’t depend on it. It’s a good addition. I like those likes. I like those connections that I’m making, but it’s not something that I’m actively trying to work for every day. I’m working for other things and that’s just an added bonus.

Rose:

And it’s a bit of a backwards step sometimes as well, because we do have this body positivity movement, but it’s still about that external gratification and external appreciation, right?

Nati Valderrama:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). For sure. I mean, for me with the Instagram, since it started so much with me and bikini pictures, and me and these progress pictures, now you see my profile, if you were to see my first pictures and the last ones, now I don’t really post that many pictures of me in bikini or anything like that. It’s more of just pictures of my face or a quote or whatever with a deeper caption, and those captions definitely don’t get the same… people don’t like it or follow it so much when it’s not just the girl in a bikini.

So, it’s like, where’s the balance between being someone who’s super body positive, but who also wants to talk about other things like, yes, body positivity is one of my pillars or whatever, but still it’s not something I want to be talking about all day long. When you’re talking about how body positive you are all day long, it’s like, “Hmm, are you really? What is there?” So, there’s that fine line and it’s like, “Yes, I want to talk about this, but I don’t want it to be my whole thing at all times.”

Rose:

Are there any myths or misconceptions about self-love?

Nati Valderrama:

I guess one of the myths might be that it’s narcissistic. While I was doing my research on how to phrase self-love. I saw a lot of websites saying, “Yeah, self-love can be narcissistic if you blah, blah, blah.” And I was like, “No, self-love is not narcissistic if you’re taking the right approach.” So, I guess it depends on what you mean by self-love, some people might be yeah, conceited, but I don’t think people who are conceited are practicing self-love. Some people are obsessed with power, but that doesn’t mean that’s because they love themselves, maybe it’s from a lack of love. So, I think it really depends on how you’re defining self-love or who the person who is promoting self-love is. If that makes sense.

Rose:

Yeah, absolutely. Now, we did get a few questions from our community. So, I’m just going to ask you a few of those as well. So, the first one, and I think this is a really nice question. Is self-love tough? And I personally think self-love is actually tough love. It goes way beyond just treating yourself. It includes catering and tending to your self-sabotaging habits too, what do you think?

Nati Valderrama:

For sure. It’s not easy. I mean, it’s not all rainbows and butterflies definitely. It’s not like, “Oh, I love myself. Life is wonderful.” It’s more than that. It’s like, “Oh, I can really be a bitch sometimes. Okay. Why am I acting this way? Oh, I’m being super jealous.” I think it’s about recognizing and being conscious of yourself, that’s part of it, that’s self-awareness. Being aware of your lights and your shadows and that’s not always easy.

If you’re just aware of your light, yeah, that’s amazing. Oh my God, I’m amazing. But if you’re also focusing on the more negative aspects of your personality, of the way you treat people, that can be a bit harder. And also dealing with all of your past traumas, that can also be included in self-love, whatever it is that you’re doing to further love yourself and take care of yourself. But in order to do that, it’s hard, the same is like going to therapy. Going to therapy you will get better ideally, but no one says it’s going to be easy throughout the process because you’re going to learn some things about yourself that maybe you’ve been shutting away from, you haven’t really accessed or looked at directly.

Rose:

Yap, absolutely. And on that too, we’re talking about and looking at the shadow side and the negative traits, so I put in air quotes. Is it difficult for people to sometimes identify the parts of their personality or who they are, that are self-sabotaging? That are blocking them from reaching that self-love goal?

Nati Valderrama:

Yeah, for sure. I mean, I think sometimes it’s so subtle. For example, I had a coaching call today. And she would say all these words like, “Ah, I should do this. I should do that. Yeah. I’m going to try.” And I just kept repeating back to her the amount of times that she used the word should or try, and I was like, “This isn’t helping you. Who is telling you that you should be doing this?” And she’s like, “Oh, it’s self-induced pressure.” Okay. And what are you getting out of this? Guilt, shame, and it took us under this whole other level, and i was like, “Okay, why are we using these words? What are these words producing for us?” And I think so many of us have it so ingrained in the way that we think we don’t even question it.

When we say, “I should do this” Or, “Oh yeah, I should do that.” And you can even think that it’s positive, but it’s still got that level of heaviness. So, I think people sometimes are not even aware of these things that they’re carrying and, sorry, I forgot your question. I think I went on a tangent.

Rose:

No, I was just talking about how people can identify, is it difficult for people to sometimes identify the parts that are blocking them from achieving the self-love goal?

Nati Valderrama:

Oh, yeah. For sure. And I think that’s why it helps to have a coach or someone who mirrors it back to you because you can be talking, or you can be saying all of this to maybe a friend and they’re like, “Yeah, it’s true.” And you can just stay in that surface level. But I think a coach is a great mirror because it’s like, “Wait, I hear you saying this and this and this, let’s explore that.” And then it’s like, “Okay. I had never realized that I have this blocking me.”

For example, with astrology, as you mentioned, I’ve been doing natal chart readings. And it’s a great compliment to my coaching calls because then we see very clearly on the chart like, “Oh, here it says you have a lot of earth on your chart. And that’s maybe why you’re such a perfectionist. And maybe why you’ve been putting all this pressure on yourself.” And your chart says it like this is a truth about you, and there it’s easier to confront it. And it’s like, “Oh, it’s not just me self-sabotaging. It’s just the way that I’m made. And now I need to… Okay, now that I’ve opened my eyes and seeing this truth about myself, how do I deal with it? How would I go forward with it?” So yes, in conclusion it is hard for people to see that. And I think it’s always good to have someone who can reflect it back to you in some way.

Rose:

And I think what you just said there about natal charts is so on point, there’s a lot that can be said for reasoning. People sometimes need a reason that they are this way or they’re not this way. And it can be really hard to accept if there’s not a higher reason, right? With the natal chart, it’s there in black and white of, these are your challenges and these are your positive traits or whatever your advantage is. So, it’s really nice that you’ve added that into your practice and into your coaching. Do you find that the way you’re doing things is different or it’s just complimentary towards what you’re already doing?

Nati Valderrama:

It’s definitely complimentary. My coaching pretty much remains the same, I usually do six sections minimum. So, usually after the third session, I’m like, “Okay, I think we’re ready. Let’s read the chart.” So I schedule another session in between, and then it helps us unlock some certain things that were not letting us move forward. So it’s like, “Oh, this is what I’ve been telling you. You complain a lot.” Or whatever. Okay. It’s written here. And then in the coaching it’s like, “Okay, we’re moving forward with this knowledge that we’ve now acquired about yourself.” Without them actually having to say it to me. So that’s also really cool because it’s like I’ll see… For example, I had a client that complained a lot. And she would always be complaining and then she’d be like, “Oh, I’m sorry. I just complained a lot. That’s just the way I am. I can’t help it.”

And then we saw her chart and yes, her chart showed that very clearly. And it was like, “Okay, so this is the truth about you. How are we going to move forward from this?” And now that we have this knowledge and it’s not just an excuse, it’s in my chart, but it’s like, “How do we work on it so that we can integrate more of that bright side or whatever you want to call it, the more positive aspects of your chart?”

So, yeah, it’s a good little compliment. And now I’ve also been adding it just for additional people who don’t want coaching, but just want their natal chart read. I do a few different sessions depending on what they want to touch on. If it’s just a general introduction to people for people who don’t really know anything about astrology, I give them a mini 20 minute lesson and then we go into their chart, and then I offer other ones where we can go a little bit deeper and talk about their destiny and their karma and the way that they work and what their career looks like and all of that, which I’ve been finding fascinating. I’ve been learning so much and then sharing it with others it’s also helped me learn more. So, for me it’s just been amazing as a self-awareness tool for myself and to be able to provide that for others as well.

Rose:

And I think again, what you just said there about people using, oh, this is in my chart. So it’s an excuse to let you off the hook. I think one of those things is, within your natal chart, it not only tells you what your challenges are, but it also gives you an opening to deal with them too. So, I think-

Nati Valderrama:

Yeah, it’s not just like, “Okay, that’s it. I’m done. This is my natal chart.” No, it’s like, “Okay, there are things I can work on here. What am I going to walk on?”

Rose:

Absolutely. Now, I just want you to just talk about self-love in relation to forgiveness, because we did have a few questions from our audience about, how do I forgive myself? What is self-love and forgiveness? Are they working together? So, what are your thoughts on forgiving yourself?

Nati Valderrama:

So, for me-

Rose:

It’s quite specific I think.

Nati Valderrama:

Yeah, it is. So I read this book, The Four Agreements, have you read it?

Rose:

No.

Nati Valderrama:

The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz. It’s an amazing book and it’s super simple, super short, but one of the agreements is always do your best. And for me, I mean The Four Agreements has really changed my life and I’ve integrated all of them, but that one, the always do your best has really changed it for me because when I know that I’m always doing my best, even if it wasn’t the best for someone else, I know that that was my best at that time. And that’s okay.

I don’t know, for example, one day I won’t be as productive as I want to be. I’ll start beating myself up and I’ll start feeling like, “Oh, why didn’t you do the three things you had on your list? It wasn’t that hard.” And I start just, “This is very negative behavior.” But then it’s like, “Wait, I did my best for today. It was a low energy day and I did my best and I still did this and this and this. Okay, cool.” As you can see for me, it’s always about productivity, so now i need to be productive. But I think as long as you know that what you’ve done is your best. And it depends on the forgiveness, is it for giving someone else? Or is it giving yourself? But when it comes to forgiving yourself, I think just knowing that you did your best at any given moment, it’s like, “Okay, therefore I release it because it’s in the past now. And I can’t really do anything about it anymore.”

And then when it comes to forgiving others, it also I think, comes to forgiving yourself. Unless it’s something that you can talk about. I don’t know. Say you have a problem with your sister, and you are holding a grudge, and you are finding it hard to forgive her. You’re finding it hard to forgive yourself for not forgiving her. So, it comes to a few options like, “Okay, are you going to talk to her about it? Yes. Okay. I’m going to talk to her about it. When you talk to her, are you going to blame her for what happened? Or are you just going to say, I forgive you.” I think it’s a complicated topic that we can go deeper on. But I think with the self-forgiveness, it just comes to that decision of like, “Okay, what role do I want to play here…” I think this is a question that’s too hard for me to explain actually.

Rose:

That’s okay.

Nati Valderrama:

I went into this whole loop.

Rose:

No, I think you explained it perfectly because what it brought to my mind was, we constantly putting dirt on ourselves all day, every day. Oh, I should have done this. And it takes me back to that client you were talking about, I should have done this. Those micro thoughts in your mind, those are the things that you need to forgive yourself for as well. There might be an overarching big picture that you want to forgive yourself for and move forward, but you’re so right, it’s thinking about the small things in your life that you’re putting on yourself that you just need to let go and say, “You know what? There’s no should. It’s a word that puts negative connotations on the effort you’ve put in already.”

Nati Valderrama:

Yeah, no, it’s such a big baggage. The word should, I’ve been working on that for the past four years. Just trying not to use the word should, trying. I’m also trying not to use the word try. But the word should really has such a negative weight to it. And it’s something that you put on yourself, no one is telling you should. And if there’s someone telling you, you should do this, that person also needs to work on it because it’s like, “What do you get out of telling people, you should be doing this. You should be doing that.” It’s just that judgment, and that nothing is okay, because you should be doing something better in [inaudible 00:28:06]. Let’s not use that word guys.

Rose:

It’s funny you bring that up. I actually was talking to a friend the other day and she smokes and I said, “Oh, you should stop smoking.” And she said, “That’s such a dirty word.” And it made me check myself and go, “Oh…” There’s such power in language, about the language we give to other people, and we tell ourselves, right?

Nati Valderrama:

Yeah. For sure. No, and with the smoking thing I feel that because I have friends who smoke and I’m like, “Why are you smoking? You’re doing this and it’s terrible for your health.” But I think they’ve heard it so many times. Somebody telling them like, “Oh, you should stop smoking.” It’s not going to make them, “Oh, you know what? Maybe I should.” And then they don’t know, it’s never like that. It’s more like, “Hmm. Okay. So, why do you smoke? What does it produce for you?” And maybe going a little bit deeper. Because we think we’re trying to help others when we tell them like, “You should stop smoking.” But really we’re just making them feel worse about something that they probably don’t feel very proud of anyway.

Rose:

Yeah, absolutely. Now, I just want to come back to the whole self-love thing, come a bit self-full circle. So, one of the questions that we got was about healing self-love. So, what would you say to those people who feel they have potentially loved themselves once, and it’s gone away and they don’t know how to get that back. They don’t know how to heal it and heal by self-esteem?

Nati Valderrama:

I think one good way to start is to have some pleasure practice in your life. So, whether that’s dancing in your undies around the house. Well, maybe that’s not the best example because people who hate themselves or who don’t really love themselves, that’s usually related to somebody, their body in general. So, I think it’s just like for me, I dance, whenever I’m feeling low I put on some music that I love and dance or sing, and that already gives me these endorphins, and it makes me feel really good about myself. So, things like that, I’ve always been adding into my life and they always add up to me feeling a little bit better about myself and feeling a little bit more present in my body. And another thing that I’ve been working on with my clients is the self-compassion.

So, I think it starts with checking the way that you’re speaking to yourself, and thinking, would I tell a friend? Would I say this to a friend? So for example, you wake up and you’re like, “You’re a failure.” And it’s like, “Would you ever say to a friend you’re a failure?” And if you wouldn’t, then check why are you speaking to yourself that way. You wake up and you’re like, “Oh, I’m so fat. These clothes don’t fit anymore.” It’s like, “Would you ever tell a friend you’re so fat your clothes don’t fit… ?” I mean, maybe some people would, but check yourself if you’re doing that. But for me that has been a really powerful practice, in like when I look at myself in the mirror and a negative thought pops up or when I’m just working and a negative thought comes up about like, “You’re not being productive enough.” Or whatever. It’s always like, “Wait, I am doing my best first of all, and second, I would never say this to a friend. I would never treat them the way that I am.” Unconsciously you repeat treating myself all day long.

So, I think that’s a really good exercise to have, to just start taking that step back and being like, “Wait, would I ever say this to a friend? Probably not. I should be a little bit kinder to myself.” And I think that helps in the long run. And I know that self-healing is a long journey. Self-love is a long journey. And I think it’s just about integrating these daily practices that take you one step closer. So it’s not about that all or nothing. It’s like, “I loved myself so much and I’m never going to love myself again.” It’s like, “No. How can I love myself a little bit better today? What one thing can I do for myself today?” And I think when you take it like those baby steps and it becomes less of this monumental challenge of reaching self-love and it’s just like, “Okay, I can do this for myself today, pat in the back, I did it.”

Rose:

I think that’s a really nice way to end the podcast Nati. I’m just thinking about those small steps, but breaking it down, every journey starts with a single step, right? So, take those small steps, do something small for yourself today and you can be on your way. So, thank you Nati for being on the podcast, and we’ll put the links to your website and those kinds of things in the show notes, but just so people can hear it. Can you just tell people your website address?

Nati Valderrama:

Yeah. It’s nativalderrama.com, and the Instagram is also Nati Valderrama altogether.

Rose:

Excellent. All right. Thank you so much for joining me.

Nati Valderrama:

Thank you Rose. Have a lovely day.

Announcer:

Thank you for listening to the Numerologist Podcast. If you loved it, make sure you subscribe and don’t forget to check the show notes for an extra special free gift.

 

Share and Enjoy !

0Shares
0 0 0

About The Numerologist Team

Numerology nerds passionate about personal growth and spirituality! We’re a small team of numerologists, teachers, writers, and tech wizards who have come together to bring you the most accurate, powerful, and profound wisdom available in the world.

To Get Your Weekly Cosmic Update, Enter Your Details Below...

Each week, we'll send you your guide to the most remarkable and mystifying cosmic events of the week (& other goodies!)

Close this window

Thank You!

Keep an eye on your inbox for next week's guide to the most remarkable & mystifying cosmic events ahead (& other goodies)

Close this window

To Get Your Weekly Cosmic Update, Enter Your Details below...

Each week, we'll send you your guide to the most remarkable and mystifying cosmic events of the week (& other goodies!)

Close this window

Just 1 More Step...

Can we ask you something personal?

Your birth details help us personalize your experience and content. They will never be shared.

Close this window